About your Search

20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
confusing. >> must have been a really interesting class. >>> it is a question posed by candidate ronald reagan. over three decades ago. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? >> and it's a message the candidates are still actually using today. >> the president has no record to run on. in fact, every president since the great depression who asked americans to send them into a second term could say that you are better off today than you were four years ago, except for jimmy carter and for president barack obama. >> if people think they're better off, i would say, well, take a look at the numbers when it comes to median household income, which is down every year for the last four years. >> the obama administration, however, is taking the other side. >> you want to know whether we're better off. i got a little bumper sticker for you. osama bin laden is dead and general motors is alive! >> bloomberg business week took a look at that very question in this week's election issue asking about the price of your food, the value of your home and your paycheck. staff writer took the que
, but, ron, i want you to talk a little bit about this because this is ronald reagan when he blew his first debate against walter mondale. this happened back in 1984. he seemed confused. some people, you know, thought elderly and confused. he really came back with -- in the second debate. here's what he said. >> and i want you to know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> ron, does biden need to throw one of those at ryan there? i mean, these guys are not the same age. >> game, set, match in 1984. no, it's interesting. this is the widest age gap we've had in a vice presidential debate. on the other hand, what's interesting, suzanne, you know, they both are sort of unusually early starting politicians. biden was elected to the senate at 29. paul ryan to the house at 28. they both kind of made their way in washington, but i think the contrast between them will be enormous. joe biden can't reverse this race by himself. the race has changed, i think, fundamentally. you had a slice
revenue. ronald reagan, six years during his tax reform we went from $600 billion to $1 trillion worth of revenue. that's a 67% increase. even george bush's tax cuts, in 2003, federal revenue was a little under $1.8 trillion. before the housing vote, $2.5 trillion. that's a 42% increase in revenue to the federal government. lowering marginal tax rates is incentivizing. >> i hear you on that. what people are taking exception to is without details, as a taxpayer, of what's on the table and what's off the table, it's a very easy way to throw out numbers without necessarily being having to be responsible for the math working out. i mean i thought martha raddatz did a very good job on this. she's sort of like you're not again going to give specifics. and chris wallace -- >> you are giving specifics as you're giving directions to congress. this is what ceos do. listen, as you design this, make sure that people making $200,000 will not have their tax burden lowered. but we're going to lower their marginal tax rate because that produces inseverives for them to create jobs. for people making le
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)